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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

5 edition of Health care for the poor in Latin America and the Caribbean found in the catalog.

Health care for the poor in Latin America and the Caribbean

by Carmelo Mesa-Lago

  • 355 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Pan American Health Organization, Inter-American Foundation in Washington, D.C, Arlington, VA .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Latin America.,
  • Caribbean Area.
    • Subjects:
    • Poor -- Medical care -- Latin America.,
    • Poor -- Medical care -- Caribbean Area.,
    • Health services accessibility -- Latin America.,
    • Health services accessibility -- Caribbean Area.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 217-234).

      StatementCarmelo Mesa-Lago.
      SeriesPAHO scientific publication ;, no. 539, Publicaciones científicas (Washington, D.C.) ;, no. 539.
      ContributionsPan American Sanitary Bureau., Pan American Health Organization., Inter-American Foundation.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsRA10 P252 no. 539, RA418.5.P6 P252 no. 539
      The Physical Object
      Pagination234 p. :
      Number of Pages234
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1747439M
      ISBN 109275115397
      LC Control Number92061991

      Catholic Relief Services works in 17 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. CRS' humanitarian work in the region provides people with access to health care and education, helps tens of thousands of farmers improve their productivity and environmental resilience in the face of climate change, and assists communities in preparing for and responding to natural disaster. CRS also works with. Health issues. Tropical diseases are important issues in Colombia because they are major causes of death. Malaria affects nearly 85% of the national territory, mainly the Pacific ocean coast, the Amazon jungle and eastern savannas, with an estimated of , cases/year and a mortality rate of 3/, The main agent is Plasmodium vivax with 66% of the cases, except on the Pacific coast.

      The book opens with four articles focused on the economic, sociocultural, and environmental determinants of obesity. The first reviews the evidence of growing obesity in Latin America and the Caribbean, and considers why obesity is most prevalent in the poorest socioeconomic sectors, where levels of co-existing nutrient deficiencies may. (persons 65+/persons ) in were 11 in Latin America, 14 across the Caribbean and 22 in North America. By , it is projected that the dependency rates will have more than doubled: 24 in.

      President Trump has issued a long overdue Executive Order (EO) opening up health care markets to a new regime of choice and course, his liberal detractors are up in arms. In their joint statement, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi concluded that Trump had “apparently decided to punish the American people for his inability to improve. The economic and political structures which sustain poverty and discrimination need to be transformed in order for poverty and poor health to be tackled. Marginalised groups and vulnerable individuals are often worst affected, deprived of the information, money or access to health services that would help them prevent and treat disease.


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Health care for the poor in Latin America and the Caribbean by Carmelo Mesa-Lago Download PDF EPUB FB2

Reports the results of a comparative study of problems confronted by the health care systems in Latin America and the Caribbean, a region where an estimated million of the poor currently have no access to health care.

The study, which focuses on conditions during the s, was designed to analyse the current and potential capacity of. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Mesa-Lago, Carmelo, Health care for the poor in Latin America and the Caribbean. Washington, D.C.: Pan American Health Organization ; Arlington, VA: Inter-American Foundation, Summary: Reports the results of a comparative study of problems confronted by the health care systems in Latin America and the Caribbean, a region where an estimated million of the poor currently have no access to health care.

Organization and Delivery of Health Care in Latin America and the Caribbean. The health sector faces two demands that appear, on first examination, to be contradictory: firstly, to provide expanded and equitable access to quality health care services and, secondly, to reduce or at least control the rising costs of health care services.

The overall magnitude, trends and incidence of poverty in Latin America and the Caribbean are discussed, and an overall evaluation of health care, the poor's access to health services, and the costs and financing of health care in the region is provided.

In-depth analyses of health care protection of the poor in Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay, are presented, focusing Cited by: 1.

An estimated million of the poor in Latin America and the Caribbean currently have no access to health care.

This publication, the culmination of a study carried out over a two-year period from toreviews the problems confronted by the health care systems in Latin America and the Caribbean during the s, analyzes their current and potential capacity to provide adequate health.

Latin America continues to segregate different social groups into separate health-system segments, including two separate public sector blocks: a well resourced social security for salaried workers and their families and a Ministry of Health serving poor and vulnerable people with low standards of quality and needing a frequently impoverishing payment at point of by: The first single-authored comprehensive introduction to major contemporary research trends, issues, and debates on the anthropology of Latin America and the Caribbean.

The text provides wide and historically informed coverage of key facets of Latin American and Caribbean societies and their cultural and historical development as well as the powerful role of power and inequality in this Cited by: This report provides a status update on the human resources for health (HRH) sub-system in six Latin American and Caribbean countries: Colombia, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Panama, Peru, and Uruguay.

The report structures its discussion around how the health workforce is financed, organized, managed, regulated, and performing. In particular, starting in the s, reforms aimed at strengthening health systems to reduce inequalities in health access and outcomes focused on expansion of universal health coverage, especially for poor citizens.

In Latin America, health-system reforms have produced a distinct approach to universal health coverage, underpinned by the. In Latin America and the Caribbean, inequality is preventing a return to an inclusive growth trajectory in the face of daunting external conditions.

The Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) projects the region’s growth to be % for   All of this despite Cuba spending just $ per person annually on health care compared with America’s $9, In Cuba, health care is protected under the.

Over the past three decades, many countries of Latin America and the Caribbean have recognized health as a human right. Since the early s, 46 million more people in the countries studied are covered by health programs with explicit guarantees of affordable care.

A new IFC report finds that Africa needs substantial private investment to meet growing demand for health care.

IFC estimates that over the next decade, $$30 billion in new investment will be needed to meet Africa’s health care demand. In Toward Universal Health Coverage and Equity in Latin America and the Caribbean: Evidence from Select Countries, the authors show that evidence from an analysis of 54 household surveys corroborates that investments in extending coverage are yielding results.

Although the Format: Paperback. Byaccording to the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, the Cuban health sector had risen to occupy around 2 percent of total tourism. Some of these revenues are in turn transferred to health care for ordinary Cubans, although the size and importance of these transfers is both unknown and controversial.

The problem discussed in this paper is the failure of ICT networks and services to effectively reach the poor, particularly those living in rural areas, in Latin America and the Caribbean. Health Condition: Among the rural poor in Mexico, the incidence of preventable childhood and adult illnesses, poor reproductive outcomes (including low birth weight), and infant mortality are high - the result of unhygienic living conditions, poor nutrition, and social deprivation.

Intervention or Program: The Programa de Educacion, Salud y Alimentacion (Progresa) - now known as Oportunidades. It is not surprising that it is vulnerable to covid, like the rest of Latin America and the Caribbean.

As of April 23rd it had reported 1, cases and 40 deaths. In proportion to its. Multiple reasons, including: 1. Poverty - While some of the nations in Latin America have vast mineral and agricultural wealth (Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil, Mexico, etc), most of their populations are also rather large, meaning that it’s difficult.

Latin America and Caribbean countries have made meaningful progress toward universal health coverage. On average, the region enjoys a relatively good position with people living longer and healthier lives. Despite these advances, much remains to be done to close the equity gap and address new health challenges in the region.Presents the results of a measurement of progress toward universal health coverage (UHC) in nine Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) countries by describing population coverage by different schemes and analyzing how health outcomes, service coverage, and financial protection measures have changed over time and across socioeconomic groups.Left behind: chronic poverty in Latin America and the Caribbean (English) Abstract.

Latin America and the Caribbean’s story in the s was one of rapid progress for many. More than 70 million people moved out of poverty and started on the path to a better life for themselves and their families.

The middle class grew at an impressive Cited by: